LNY

1254 Paterson Plank Rd Secaucus, NJ - Photo by Savage Habbit

1254 Paterson Plank Rd Secaucus, NJ - Photo by Savage Habbit

LNY took his vision and research of the town to create this beautiful piece. At the center is a portrait of Henry Krajewski, a local American politician who ran for the United States Presidency in 1952 and in 1956 for the “Poor Man’s Party” and who, having a background as a pig farmer, ran under the promise of “no piggy deals in Washington.” This form of blue collar affinity led him to create an image of the “Average American” and to represent this ideal as a tall, hard working, pig farmer turned politician. Always relegated as the armpit of the USA, NJ seems to only nurture fighters and a strong suburban middle class. This is the case for Secaucus today with its industrial history, commercial arteries, natural marshes and wetlands. The American Redstart bird signifies this perennial back and forth of economy as a migratory big that changes its name to “candelita” or little torch when it winters in South America. The last element is a reimagining of the Prudential company’s logo, which was inspired by the towns landmark Snake Hill.

[Photo Album]

In collaboration with Mayor Michael Gonnelli and the Town of Secaucus.


127 Christopher Columbus Drive Jersey City, NJ - Photo by Stephen Olweck

127 Christopher Columbus Drive Jersey City, NJ - Photo by Stephen Olweck

Inspired by a quote from Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations (1776) “all for ourselves, and nothing for other people, seems, in every age of the world, to have been the vile maxim of the masters of mankind,” LNY created a masterful piece taking a more traditional painterly approach to the wall. Using only a brush in hand he hints at our fallen government in the bigger scheme of things and at local political drama, i.e. Lady Liberty’s flame at the end of the crown for a more direct reference to our area and lack of “America the free.”

[Photo Album]


505 Windsor Drive Secaucus, NJ - Photo by Bernadette Marciniak

505 Windsor Drive Secaucus, NJ - Photo by Bernadette Marciniak

For this massive 200 foot long wall that faces Kane Stadium Nanook, LNY, and Mata Ruda paid particular attention and homage to those whose who originally inhabited the land where Secaucus is now located, the Lenni Lenape Native Americans. In the words of the artists the “mural is a compilation of different flowers native to New Jersey as well as the Monarch butterfly, a symbol of migration for the Americas as it moves north to south during its lifetime. These symbols of locality and movement are weaved as the background and broken by a Diamondback Terrapin Turtle on the right side, a species native to black swamps and marshes and by a series of silhouettes. These silhouettes are all taken from a First Nation’s Powwow and speak to Secaucus’ Lenni Lenape history and also of the idea of a Powwow or social gathering which is echoed by the Kane Stadium location of the mural. Inside these silhouettes [they] recreated one of George Catlin’s paintings in greyscale. Catlin was the first 1800′s American painter to visually record Native American people’s and traditions in the Great Plains, [with this] one of the paintings he made during his travels and in a way serv[ing] as a reminder of the importance of representation and the artist’s role as a medium, witness and active agent in this struggle.”

[Photo Album]

In collaboration with Mayor Michael Gonnelli and the Town of Secaucus.